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Helpful Links and Resources
(Updated as of August 2008)

Regulatory Compliance: Licensing, Fire, and Public Health

Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies

Assessing and Enhancing the Quality of Child Care and Development Programs

Identification and Inclusion of Children with Special Needs

Professional Development

Data, Research, and Policy

Financing, Funding, and Technical Assistance

Professional Associations and Collaboratives

Connecting Families to Community Resources

Promoting Male Involvement in Early Care and Education Programs

Other Resources

Regulatory Compliance: Licensing, Fire and public Health

Licensing

Department of Social Services/Community Care Licensing Division: Regulates child care programs in California. Child care center and family child care home regulations are included in the California Code of Regulations, Title 22, Division 12. Information on licensing and the regulations is available from the internet at http://www.ccld.ca.gov

Within Los Angeles County, there are two regional child care offices, each serving a specific geographic area.

Los Angeles East Regional Office
1000 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 200B, MS:29:15
Monterey Park, CA 91754
(323) 981-3350

Los Angeles Northwest Regional Office
6167 Bristol Parkway, Suite 400, MS:29-13
Culver City, CA 90230
(310) 337-4333

Fire Department Contacts for Los Angeles County

County of Los Angeles Fire Department: Serves the unincorporated areas of the County and 45 cities contracted with the County for fire protection services. Information is available on the Web site at: http://www.fire.lacounty.gov/FirePrevention/FirePrevSchoolsInstitutions.asp. In addition, you can contact one of the following Fire Prevention Division, Special Units between 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Monday–Friday:

  • Schools and Institutions Unit - South
    7733 Greenleaf Street
    Whittier, CA 90602-2195
    (310) 696-2034
  • Fire Department Institutions Unit North
    14425 Olive View Drive
    Sylmar, CA 91342
    (818) 362-5472

Public Health License

County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health, Environment Health Division: All child care centers providing care for seven or more children throughout Los Angeles County (excluding Long Beach, Pasadena, and Vernon) are required to obtain a Public Health License from the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health, Environmental Health Division upon initial operation and annually thereafter. For additional information call (626) 430-5590.

City of Pasadena: For information about the City of Pasadena requirements, call (626) 744-6004.

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Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies

Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (R&Rs) give families referrals to a range of licensed child care and development programs for children from birth to 12 years old. In addition, the R&Rs provide resources and referrals to low-income families eligible for child care subsidies. Many also offer written materials on several topics, including selecting a child care and development program that is right for you, as well as brochures on child development topics, such as separation, toilet training, discipline, and more. Additionally, support services are available to help local child care and development programs enhance the quality of their services by offering trainings and resources. There are eight R&Rs serving families and child care and development programs throughout Los Angeles County:

  • Child Care Resource Center CCRC): Serves San Fernando Valley, Santa Clarita, and Antelope Valley. For additional information visit http://www.ccrcla.org or call their Chatsworth location at (818) 717-1000 or their Antelope Valley location at (661) 949-2615.
  • Children’s Home Society of California: Serves Bellflower, Cerritos, Lakewood, Long Beach, and Norwalk. For additional information visit http://www.chs-ca.org or call (562) 256-7400 X3298.
  • Connections for Children: Serves Culver City, Santa Monica, South Bay, and West Los Angeles. For additional information visit http://www.cfc-ca.org or call (310) 452-3202.
  • Crystal Stairs: Serves Gardena, Inglewood, South Central Los Angeles, Compton, Hawthorne, and Lawndale. For additional information visit http://www.crystalstairs.org or call (323) 421-1086 (Spanish); (323) 421-1028 (English).
  • Mexican American Opportunity Foundation (MAOF): Serves east and southeast Los Angeles and Montebello. For additional information visit http://www.maof.org or call (323) 890-9600 x114.
  • Options – A Child Care and Human Services Agency: Serves Pasadena, Foothill communities, San Gabriel Valley and Whittier. For additional information visit http://www.optionscc.com or call (626) 856-5900 x294.
  • Pathways: Serves Downtown Los Angeles, Highland Park, Hollywood, Mid-Wilshire, Silver Lake, and West Hollywood. For additional information call (213) 427-2700 x542.
  • Pomona Unified School District – Child Development Program: Serves Pomona and surrounding cities. For additional information call (909) 397-4740 x5263.

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Assessing and Enhancing the Quality of Child Care and Development Programs

Frank Porter Graham (FPG) Child Development Institute: Devoted to the study of children from birth to eight years old and their families with a focus on parent and family support; early care and education; child health and development; early identification and intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy. Among its many projects is the development of four Environment Rating Scales: Infant/Toddler (ITERS), Early Childhood (ECERS), Family Child Care (FCCERS), and School-age Care (SACERS). The Environment Rating Scales are commonly used by researchers to assess the quality of different types of child care settings, serving different age groups and by programs to determine areas where improvement is needed. For additional information on the Environment Rating Scales and other FPG projects visit http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~ecers/.

National AfterSchool Association (NAA): Dedicated to the development, education, and care of children and youth during out-of-school hours. Project areas include a membership association, accreditation, public policy, and advocacy. For additional information visit http://www.naaweb.org or call (617) 298-5012.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC): Dedicated to improving the well-being of all young children, with particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age eight. The NAEYC Academy for Early Childhood Program Accreditation administers a national, voluntary accreditation system to help raise the quality of all types of preschools, kindergartens, and child care centers. Additional information is available at http://www.naeyc.org.

National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC): A nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting quality child care by strengthening the profession of family child care. Among the goals of NAFCC is to promote a professional accreditation program which recognizes and encourages quality care for children. Additional information is available at http://www.nafcc.org.

The Right Choice for Kids:  Created by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) to inform families about the importance of high-quality early childhood education programs for young children.  The new site features information about what NAEYC Accreditation is and why it is important, a brand new NAEYC Accreditation of Programs for Young Children search feature; updated articles for families (new ones will be available on a bi-monthly basis); videos for viewing regarding the promotion of NAEYC Accreditation; resources for families and the field; and NAEYC's Early Learning News to keep families informed about the field and accreditation.  Sometime in 2010, NAEYC will begin releasing a newsletter for parents and families.  To visit, click on http://www.rightchoiceforkids.org.

Steps to Excellence Project (STEP): STEP is a child care quality rating and support system developed by the County of Los Angeles Policy Roundtable for Child Care. STEP was launched in July 2007 as a three year pilot project in nine communities: Inglewood, Palmdale, Pomona, Florence/Firestone, Pacoima/Arleta, Wilmington, Long Beach, Pasadena, and Santa Monica. Additional information can be found at http://childcare.lacounty.gov.

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Identification and Inclusion of Children with Special Needs

Ages & Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) and ASQ:SE (Social-Emotional): Developmental screening tools are used to identify infants and children with developmental delays during their first five years of life. ASQ consists of a series of easy to administer questionnaires to be completed by parents. For additional information visit their Web site at: http://www.brookespublishing.com/tools/asq/index.htm.

California Children’s Services (CCS): Arranges, directs and pays for medical care, equipment and rehabilitation when authorized. Services can be authorized for children and young adults under the age of 21 who have eligible medical conditions and whose families are unable to pay for all or part of their care. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.dhs.ca.gov/pcfh/cms/ccs.

California Legislative Blue Ribbon Commission on Autism: Established to have a direct impact on children and adults with autism spectrum disorders. For additional information visit their Web site at:http://senweb03.senate.ca.gov/autism/index.html.

California Early Start: Accessed through the Regional Centers, infants and toddlers from birth to 36 months may be eligible for early intervention services if they have a cognitive, communication, social or emotional, adaptive or physical or motor developmental delay, or are at risk for a delay in their development. Teams of coordinators, health care providers, early intervention specialists, therapists and parent resource specialists can evaluate and assess an infant and toddler and provide appropriate early intervention services to eligible children. For additional information visit the California Department of Developmental Services Web site at http://www.dds.ca.gov or contact your local Regional Center (see below for a listing of the Regional Centers located throughout Los Angeles County).

California Map to Inclusive Child Care: Funded by the California Department of Education, Child Development Division and administered by the WestEd Center for Child and Family Studies, committed to improving the delivery of quality child care services to children with disabilities and other special needs in inclusive settings. Hosts comprehensive listing of inclusive child care resources, Web site links, and California information. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.CAInclusiveChildCare.org.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) – “Learn the Signs. Act Early.”: A Web‑based resource with information on identifying the early signs of a delay in an infant’s development, including autism. For additional information visit the CDC/NCBDDD Web site at http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/ActEarly/default.htm.

Child Care Law Center: A legal resource on child care issues in California, providing information and training to nonprofit child care centers, family child care providers and others. Issues addressed include children with disabilities, child care subsidies, facilities and supply of child care, and licensing and regulation of child care. For additional information visit http://www.childcarelaw.org or call their Information and Referral Line at (415) 394-7144 between
12 p.m. and 3 p.m. on Mondays and Thursdays.

Child Health and Disability Prevention (CHDP): A preventive health program serving California’s low-income children and teens. Services include periodic health assessments, dental services, care coordination, and nutrition surveillance. Children with suspected problems are referred for diagnosis and treatment. For additional information visit http://www.dhs.ca.gov/pcfh/cms/chdp/ or contact your local health department:

  • City of Long Beach at (562) 570-7980
  • City of Pasadena at (626) 744-6015
  • County of Los Angeles at (800) 993-2437

Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood: An international organization dedicated to working with or on behalf of children with special needs, birth through age eight, and their families. Focus is on promoting policies and practices that support families and enhance the optimal development of children. For additional information visit http://www.dec-sped.org or call (406) 543-0872.

Family Resource Centers Network of California: In collaboration with the local Regional Centers, Family Resource Centers provide parent-to-parent support to families with infants and toddlers at risk of or with developmental disabilities by helping them access information about early intervention services. For additional information visit http://www.frnca.org. Also see http://lapublichealth.org/cms/publications.asp for a link to the Directory of Parent-to-Parent Resource Centers for Children with Special Needs and Children with Special Health Care Needs in Los Angeles County.

Frank Porter Graham (FPG) Child Development Institute: Devoted to the study of children from birth to eight years old and their families with a focus on parent and family support; early care and education; child health and development; early identification and intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy. Among its many projects is the Recognition and Response Project, which is designed to help early childhood teachers and parents recognize children who show signs of learning difficulty and respond in ways that help them experience early school success. It consists of four components: (1) screening, assessment, and progress monitoring (recognition), (2) research-based curriculum and instruction for all children and validated interventions for individual children who need additional supports (response), (3) an intervention hierarchy, and (4) a collaborative problem-solving process that involves teachers, specialists, and parents. Additional information is available on this and other FPG projects can be found at http://www.fpg.unc.edu/.

Healthy Families: A low-cost insurance program for children and teens not eligible for Medi‑Cal, covering physical, dental, vision, and mental health. For additional information visit http://www.healthyfamilies.ca.gov or call toll-free (800) 880-5305.

Individual Education Plan (IEP): Developed by a team including parents, teachers, other school staff, and the student, the IEP defines the education goals of a student identified as eligible for special education supports and services. The school district is responsible for ensuring that services are provided and the goals of the IEP are met. The IEP team meets at least annually to review the child’s progress and the child must be re-evaluated at least every three years. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/iepguide/index.html.

Individual Family Services Plan (IFSP): Similar to the IEP, outlines a plan of action establishing how early intervention specialists will work with families of eligible infants and toddlers (birth to 36 months) at risk of or with developmental delays that address the child’s needs, parents’ concerns, and the resources needed to support the child’s development. For additional information visit http://www.dds.cahwnet.gov/earlystart/eshome.cfm.

Infant Development Association (IDA) of California: A multi-disciplinary organization of parents and professionals committed to optimal developmental, social and emotional outcomes for infants, birth to three, with a broad range of special needs, and their families. Advocates for improved, effective prevention and early intervention services and provides information, education and training to parents, professionals, decision makers and others. For additional information visit http://www.idaofcal.org or call (916) 453-8801.

National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY): A source of information on: disabilities in infants, toddlers, children and youth; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA); No Child Left Behind as it relates to children with disabilities; and research-based information on effective educational practices. For additional information visit http://www.nichcy.org or call (800) 695-0285 v/tty.

Parents’ Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS): An evidence-based screening tool for parents, and professionals to use to detect possible developmental and behavioral problems in children from birth to eight years old. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.pedstest.com or call (615) 776-4121.

Public Counsel Law Center: A public interest law office providing free legal and social services to low-income people throughout Los Angeles County. The Early Care and Education Unit provides free legal assistance to existing and prospective state licensed family child care providers and nonprofit child care centers. The Children’s Rights Project (CRP) provides free legal and advocacy services on behalf of children and youth. Among their areas of focus, the CRP assists families with children with disabilities navigate the services to which they are entitled. For additional information visit http://www.publiccounsel.org or call (213) 385-2977.

Regional Centers: Nonprofit corporations that contract with the California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) to provide or coordinate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities. For additional information on DDS’ services and supports for children and adults with developmental disabilities, visit http://www.dds.ca.gov. There are seven Regional Centers throughout Los Angeles County that contract with the California Department of Developmental Services to provide or coordinate services to individuals with developmental disabilities:

  • Eastern Los Angeles Regional Center: Serves eastern Los Angeles County including the communities of Alhambra and Whittier. For additional information visit http://www.elarc.org or call (626) 299-4700.
  • Frank Lanterman Regional Center: Serves central Los Angeles County including Burbank, Glendale, and Pasadena. For additional information visit http://www.lanterman.org or call (213) 383-1300.
  • Harbor Regional Center: Serves southern Los Angeles County including Bellflower, Harbor, Long Beach, and Torrance. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.harborrc.com or call (310) 540-1711.
  • North Los Angeles County Regional Center: Serves northern Los Angeles County including San Fernando and Antelope Valleys. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.nlacrc.org or call (818) 778-1900.
  • San Gabriel/Pomona Regional Center: Serves eastern Los Angeles County including El Monte, Monrovia, Pomona, and Glendora. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.sgprc.org or call (909) 620-7722.
  • South Central Los Angeles Regional Center (SCLARC): Serves southern Los Angeles County including the communities of Compton and Gardena. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.sclarc.org or call (213) 473-0951.
  • Westside Regional Center: Serves western Los Angeles County including the communities of Culver City, Inglewood, and Santa Monica. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.westsiderc.org or call (310) 258-4000.

Special Education Local Planning Areas (SELPA): Each school district belongs to a Special Education Local Planning Area (SELPA), which is responsible for providing special education programs for children with disabilities and other special needs. Each SELPA has an infant program for children up to age three and provides special education for children from age three and up. There are 16 SELPAs in Los Angeles County:

  • ABC/Norwalk-La Mirada USD SELPA: Serves ABC and Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School Districts. For additional information call (562) 926-5566 x21189.
  • Antelope Valley SELPA: Serves Acton-Agua Dulce Unified School District, Antelope Valley Union High School District, Eastside Union School District, Gorman School District, Hughes-Elizabeth Lakes Union School District, Keppel Union School District, Lancaster School District, Palmdale School District, Westside Union School District, and Wilsona School District. For additional information call (661) 274-4136.
  • Downey/Montebello SELPA*: Serves Downey and Montebello Unified School Districts. For additional information call (562) 531-2566.
  • East San Gabriel Valley SELPA*: Serves Azusa, Baldwin Park, Bassett, Bonita, Charter Oak, Claremont, Covina-Valley, Glendora, Pomona, Walnut Valley, and West Covina Unified School Districts. For additional information call (626) 966-1679.
  • Foothill SELPA: Serves Burbank, Glendale and La Canada Unified School Districts. For additional information call (818) 246-5378.
  • Long Beach Unified School District SELPA: Serves Long Beach Unified School District. For additional information call (562) 422-6868.
  • Los Angeles County Office of Education SELPA: For additional information call (562) 401-5737.
  • Los Angeles Unified School District SELPA, Infant and Preschool Support Services: Serves Los Angeles Unified School District. For additional information call (213) 241-4713.
  • §Mid-Cities SELPA: Serves Bellflower, Compton, Lynwood, and Paramount Unified School Districts. For additional information call (562) 531-2566.
  • Pasadena Unified School District SELPA: Serves Pasadena Unified School District. For additional information call (626) 795-6981.
  • Puente Hills SELPA: Serves Hacienda La Puente and Rowland Unified School Districts. For additional information call (562) 833-8345.
  • Santa Clarita SELPA*: Serves Castaic Union, Newhall, Saugus Union, Sulphur Springs Union, and William S. Hart School Districts. For additional information call (661) 294-5398.
  • Southwest SELPA*: Serves Centinela Valley Union High School District, El Segundo Unified, Hawthorne, Hermosa Beach City, Inglewood Unified, Lawndale, Lennox, Manhattan Beach Unified, Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified, Redondo Beach Unified, Torrance Unified, and Wiseburn School Districts. For additional information call (310) 798-2731 or the Family Resource Center at (310) 921-2252.
  • Tri-City SELPA: Serves Beverly Hills, Culver City and Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School Districts. For additional information call (310) 842-4220.
  • West San Gabriel Valley SELPA*: Serves Alhambra City and High School, Arcadia Unified, Duarte Unified, El Monte City, El Monte Union High, Garvey, Monrovia Unified, Mount View, Rosemead, San Gabriel Unified, San Marino Unified, South Pasadena Unified, Temple City Unified, and Valle Lindo School Districts. For additional information call (626) 254-9406.
  • Whittier Area Cooperative SELPA: East Whittier City, El Rancho Unified, Little Lake City, Los Nietos, South Whittier, Whittier City, and Whittier Union High School Districts. For additional information call (562) 945-6431.

* Administered by the Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE).

Special Needs Advisory Project (SNAP): Provides education and resources for families and child care providers and strives to increase opportunities for children with disabilities and other special needs to access high quality early care and education programs. For additional information visit http://www.snapla.org or contact your local child care resource and referral agency.

The Alliance for Children’s Rights: Provides direct legal services, community education and advocacy on behalf of children living in foster care, children with learning disabilities, children who need medical treatment or public benefits, and children in need of legal guardianship or adoption. For additional information visit http://www.kids-alliance.org or call (213) 368-6010.

WestEd: A nonprofit research, development and service agency dedicated to enhancing and increasing education and human development within schools, families and communities. Program areas include the Center for Prevention and Early Intervention (CPEI) and the Program for Infant/Toddler Care (PITC). For additional information visit http://www.wested.org or contact their headquarters toll-free at (877) 493-7833.

Zero to Three: National nonprofit multidisciplinary organization that supports the healthy development and well-being of infants, toddlers and their families by informing, educating, and supporting the work of professionals and parents. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.zerotothree.org or call their Western Office at (213) 481-7279.

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Professional Development

A Place of Our Own/Los Niños en Su Casa: KCET’s A Place of Our Own (and Los Niños en Su Casa in Spanish) is a daily television series, a Web site, and an extensive outreach program devoted to the unique needs of people who care for children, including families, friends, neighbors and child care providers. For additional information visit http://www.aplaceofourown.org or http://www.losninosensucasa.org.

California Commission on Teacher Credentialing: California offers six levels of Child Development Permits, each with its own set of requirements and each allowing the holder of the permit to perform different levels of service in child development programs. The six levels of Child Development Permits are: Assistant, Associate Teacher, Teacher, Master Teacher, Site Supervisor, and Program Director. For additional information on Child Development Permits, visit http://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/CREDS/child-dev-permits.html. For technical assistance, see the Child Development Training Consortium also listed in this section.

California Early Childhood Mentor Program: Provides training to experienced child care professionals interested in becoming mentors to new practitioners. Interested candidates may submit applications to a local Mentor Selection Committee, who reviews each candidate’s professional qualifications and conducts a quality review of the candidate’s classroom. Selected Mentors receive a paid stipend for continuing in-service training and supervision of student teachers assigned to the Mentors’ classrooms. Candidates selected as Director Mentors are paid stipends for guiding and offering practical help to protégé directors or site supervisors. For additional information about the Mentor Program and to locate community colleges that participate visit http://www.ecementor.org.

California Preschool Instructional Network (CPIN): Provides professional development and technical assistance to preschool teachers and administrators to ensure preschool children are ready for school. The Networks are organized into 11 regions of the state; Los Angeles County belongs to Region 11 and is hosted by the LACOE. For additional information and a schedule of upcoming trainings visit http://www.cpin.us.

Child Development Institute (CDI):  CDI provides families and other caregivers with guidance in building consistent and responsive relationships and creating natural and healthy environments for children with a range of developmental challenges.  CDI offers an array of programs and services to families and those that serve them, including mental health therapy, speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, social skills groups, Relationship-based Behavioral Therapy, Early Learners, Teacher Support Services, and Parent Support Services.   Teacher Support Services enables preschool teachers to identify and understand developmental progression, including individual sensory, temperament and learning differences. It provides essential instruction in classroom collaboration and relationship development. Teachers learn to develop inclusion strategies for children with special needs.  In addition, CDI has an Assessment Clinic to help parents by providing developmental assessments and diagnostic evaluations. Upon completion of an assessment, families receive treatment recommendations, education and support to navigate and make the most of the resources available in their community; and a Feeding Clinic, which offers a nurturing place for families to learn effective feeding strategies in a therapeutic environment. For more information, visit www.childdevelopmentinstitute.org or call (818) 888-4559

Child Development Training Consortium (CDTC): Funded by the California Department of Education/Child Development Division (CDE/CDD), promotes high quality early education to children and families by providing financial and technical assistance to child development students and professionals. Services include:

Community College Program: Funds specific education costs at specified community colleges for eligible students pursuing careers in child care/development.

Child Development Permit Stipends: Pays application processing fees for first time, renewing, and upgrading on the six levels of the Child Development Permit Matrix. In addition, reimburses first-time permit applicants $56 for the Live Scan fingerprinting processing fee.

Career Incentive Grants: Reimburses eligible students pursuing careers in child care/development for the cost of tuition, books, and other enrollment fees.

Professional Growth Advisors: Provides training and support to new and previously trained professional growth advisors and maintains a registry of advisors. To renew a Child Development Permit, a permit holder (except Associate Teacher who must follow separate requirements) must follow five-year renewal cycle requirements per the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing’s The California Professional Growth Manual for Child Development Permits.

For additional information on CDTC services, visit http://www.childdevelopment.org or call (209) 572-6080. In addition, the Child Development Permit Matrices may be downloaded from http://www.childdevelopment.org/cs/cdtc/print/htdocs/services_permit.htm.

Investing in Early Educators Stipend Program (Stipend Program): Funded by the CDE/CDD and developed by the County of Los Angeles Child Care Planning Committee, the Stipend Program is designed to increase the retention of early educators working in child development programs – centers and family child care homes – serving low income children. In addition, the Stipend Program helps early educators move towards completing college courses that contribute towards holding or upgrading their child development permit and achieving an Associate, Bachelor, and/or Master degree in child development or a closely related field. Detailed information regarding upcoming Stipend Cycles, eligibility, requirements for receiving a stipend, and the application process are available at http://www.childcare.lacounty.gov or by calling the Office of Child Care at (213) 974-4674.

Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE) Child Care Training Institute (CCTI): Offers training on a range of topics for licensed and license-exempt providers countywide. Trainings are offered in English and Spanish. Persons who have completed multiple sessions are eligible for start-up kits, which include children’s books, mats, manipulatives, etc. For additional information call (562) 922-8931 or toll-free at (888) 310-1161.

Model Compensation Scale for Child Care Centers: In 2005, the County of Los Angeles Child Care Planning Committee released a model compensation scale for child care centers operating within the County. Information on the scale can be reviewed at http://www.childcare.lacounty.gov.

WestEd: Program for Infant-Toddler Caregivers (PITC): A project of the Center for Child and Family Studies, PITC is committed to increasing the availability and quality of child care for all children under the age of three, disseminating information that increases the practice of responsive, respectful and relationship-based infant-toddler care, and influencing national, regional and local policies and practices so that the needs of infants, toddlers and their families are the foundation for all curriculum development and program activity. For additional information visit http://www.pitc.org.

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Data, Research and Policy

California Budget Project: Engages in independent fiscal and policy analysis and public education with the goal of improving public policies affecting the economic and social well-being of low- and middle-income Californians. For additional information visit http://www.cbp.org.

California Child Care Resource & Referral Network: Provides leadership and vision for the continuous development and improvement of resource and referral services statewide, helping to build, support, and advocate for a quality child care system that supports the diversity of families and children in every community in California. Among its projects is the publication of the Child Care Portfolio, a biennial series of statewide and county-by-county statistical reports about child care costs, supply, and demand. For additional information visit http://www.rrnetwork.org.

California Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO): Provides fiscal and policy advice to the Legislature and conducts analyses of the state budget. The LAO is overseen by the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC), a 16-member bipartisan committee. The office currently has a staff of 43 analysts and approximately 13 support staff. Among the subject areas of its analytical staff are K-12 Education (inclusive of early care and education), Health, and Social Services. For additional information visit http://www.lao.ca.gov.

Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP): A national nonprofit that works to improve the lives of low-income people. CLASP conducts research, provides policy analysis, advocates at the federal and state levels, and offers information and technical assistance on a range of family policy and equal justice areas on a range of topics including child care and early education. For additional information visit http://www.clasp.org.

Center for the Study of Social Policy (CCSP): Strives to help states and localities implement creative and effective strategies that strengthen disadvantaged communities and families and ensure that children grow up healthy, safe, successful in school, and ready for productive adulthood. Among CCSP’s major community building initiatives is Strengthening Families Through Early Care & Education, which uses early childhood programs to build evidence-based protective factors for children and their families. Strengthening Families’ protective factors approach helps parents who might be at risk for abuse and neglect to find resources, supports, or coping strategies that allow them to parent effectively, even under stress. The presence of the protective factors appears to reduce the likelihood of child mistreatment. Using a logic model for reducing child abuse and neglect through early care and education, the approach builds upon parent and child resiliency rather than reducing risk. For additional information on CCSP, the Strengthening Families approach, and their other initiatives, visit http://www.ccsp.org.

ChildCareExchange.com: Promotes the exchange of ideas among leaders in early childhood programs worldwide through its magazine, books, training products, training seminars, and international conferences. For additional information visit http://www.childcareexchange.com.

Child Development Policy Institute (CDPI): A non-partisan, independent organization whose mission is to help establish sound public policy that benefits the children of California. Advocates on behalf of the child care and development field on fiscal and policy matters and for children and families in the California budget process. For additional information visit http://www.cdpi.net.

Children Now: A national organization for people who care about children and want to ensure that they are the top public policy priority. Early care and education is among their top priority issues. For additional information visit http://www.childrennow.org.

Children’s Defense Fund: The Children’s Defense Fund’s Leave No Child Behind® mission is to ensure every child a healthy start, a head start, a fair start, a safe start, and a moral start in life and successful passage to adulthood with the help of caring families and communities. For additional information visit http://www.childrensdefense.org.

HealthyCity: Provides access to a data base of community resources, demographic/health data, and GIS mapping technology. Visit http://www.healthycity.org to access a variety of data on such topics as demographics, housing, economic/employment, birth/prenatal/child health, and more.

Kids Count: A project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count is a national and state-by-state effort to track the status of children in the United States. Interactive data bases allow visitors to create free, customized geographic and demographic data reports at national, state, and local levels. Visit http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx

Kidsdata.org:  A project of the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, Kidsdata.org offers more than 200 indicators on the health and well-being of children in communities across California.  Visitors are encouraged to use the data for research, reports and other work and may reproduce tables, graphs or maps with permission to cite.  Visitors also may sign up for e-alerts to learn about current data as it becomes available.  For more information, click on http://www.kidsdata.org.

Los Angeles County Education Coordinating Council (ECC): Created by the Board of Supervisors, the ECC is charged with raising the educational achievement of foster and probation youth throughout Los Angeles County. For additional information visit http://www.educationcoordinatingcouncil.org or call (213) 974-5967.

National Women’s Law Center: Conducts advocacy on the issues that cut to the core of women's and girls' lives in education, employment, family economic security, and health - with special attention given to the needs of low-income women and their families. Issues addressed include child care and early education on which the National Women's Law Center is working to improve the quality, affordability, and accessibility of child care, with a special emphasis on ways to expand public and private financing of the changes needed to achieve these goals. For additional information visit http://www.nwlc.org.

Official California Legislative Information: The official site for California legislative information, including links to bill information, California laws, the legislature, and publications. To access this site, visit http://www.leginfo.ca.gov.

On the Capitol Doorstep: Provides information on California and federal legislation affecting children with a focus on child care and development programs providing early care and education. In addition, follows current legislative efforts related to child protection, child safety, education, health, mental health and disabilities, nutrition, and public assistance. For additional information visit http://www.otcdkids.com.

Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE): An independent research center that aims to enrich education policy debates with sound analysis and hard evidence. From preschool, to K-12, to higher education, PACE is dedicated to carefully defining issues and assessing the effectiveness of policies and programs. For additional information visit http://pace.berkeley.edu.

Preschool California: Mission is to increase access to effective pre-k programs so that all children, especially those who need it most, enter kindergarten ready to learn, read and do their best. For additional information visit http://www.preschoolcalifornia.org.

The Children's Council of Los Angeles County:  Serves as a broker and champion for children, youth and families across the regions varied and diverse neighborhoods.  Positions county, city, school, and community leaders to do what is needed now to improve the quality of life throughout Los Angeles County: design and deliver services and supports that con­sumers want, and partners with communities to enable them to create safe, healthy, nurturing, and—ideally—self-sufficient neighborhoods for their residents.  For additional information, visit http://thechildrenscouncil.net

RAND Corporation Child Policy: Conducts research on children’s issues from prenatal to 18 years old intended to help improve policy and decision making. For additional information visit http://www.rand.org/research_areas/children/.

Zero to Three: A national nonprofit multidisciplinary organization that supports the healthy development and well-being of infants, toddlers and their families by informing, educating and supporting the work of professionals and parents. For additional information visit their Web site at http://www.zerotothree.org or call their Western Office at (213) 481-7279.

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Financing, Funding, and Technical Assistance

Building Child Care (BCC) Project: Provides a centralized clearinghouse of information and services to increase the California child care sector's understanding of the facilities development process and access to facility development resources. For additional information visit http://www.buildingchildcare.org.

California Food Policy Advocate/Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP): Addresses nutrition for children in the child care setting, where increasing numbers of children receive most of their daily nourishment. Child care providers who participate in CACFP are reimbursed for two meals and one snack per day, with higher reimbursements for children living at or below 185 percent of the Federal Poverty Line. For additional information visit http://cfpa.net/ or call (415) 777-4422.

Child Care Law Center: A legal resource on child care issues in California, providing information and training to nonprofit child care centers, family child care providers and others. Issues addressed include children with disabilities, child care subsidies, facilities and supply of child care, and licensing and regulation of child care. For additional information visit http://www.childcarelaw.org or call their Information and Referral Line at (415) 394-7144 between
12 p.m. and 3 p.m. on Mondays and Thursdays.

Constructing Connections, Los Angeles: Constructing Connections programs are in several California counties, one of which is Los Angeles County. Each Constructing Connections program assists child care projects through the facilities development process from planning through construction by providing technical assistance and resources. The lead agency for Constructing Connections, Los Angeles is Public Counsel’s Early Care and Education Law Project (ECE Law Project). The ECE Law Project was established in 1986 to both increase child care capacity in low-income communities and to improve the quality of care. For additional information call 213.385.2977, ext. 300.

First 5 California: Created by Proposition 10, the California Children and Families First Act (the Act) and funded by tobacco tax funds, First 5 California Commission is the lead agency and statewide coordinator of the Act. It is designed to impact the lives of California’s young children by developing long-term public policy framework around school readiness, setting strategic goals, and integrating early childhood services into existing education, health, and social service systems. Initiatives and projects include: Early Childhood Learning and Education, Early Childhood Health, Parents and Community Education, and Tobacco Cessation. For additional information visit http://www.ccfc.ca.gov.

First 5 LA: Mission is to make significant and measurable progress towards their vision by increasing the number of children from the prenatal stage through age 5 who are physically and emotionally healthy, safe, and ready to learn. Priorities include: Early Learning, Health, and Safe Children and Families. For additional information about First 5 LA projects and funding opportunities, visit http://www.first5la.org.

Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF):Works to ensure access to high quality child care spaces for all families, particularly those living in low income neighborhoods, by providing financing and other assistance programs for the creation, expansion, improvement and preservation of child care facilities throughout California. For additional information visit http://www.liifund.org/PROGRAMS-NEW/CHILDCARE/ChildCareOverview.htm or call (415) 772-9094.

  • Low Income Investment Fund (LIIF) - Affordable Buildings for Children's Development, with a new source of funding for Los Angeles County, has a comprehensive child care facilities initiative to make loans specifically to child care facilities in Los Angeles County.  For more information, click on and read the ABCD Fund Overview and the LIIF-ABCD Child Care Facilities Initiative Handout.

Plan 4 Preschool:  A digital library for preschool planning in California, designed for program administrators looking for information on preschool quality, or a Board of Education members wondering what's going on with early education in other districts. Plan4Preschool consolidates all types of resource documents in one location.  For more information, visit www.plan4preschool.org.

Public Counsel Law Center: A public interest law office providing free legal and social services to low-income people throughout Los Angeles County. The Early Care and Education Law Project provides free legal assistance to existing and prospective state licensed family child care providers and nonprofit child care centers. Visit http://www.publiccounsel.org or call (213) 385-2977 for additional information.

Spaces for Children:  Founded in 1990 by early childhood educator Louis Torelli and architect Charles Durrett, focuses on developmentally-appropriate environments: rich places of learning that are child directed and teacher efficient.  The Web site has articles and resources on design and its impact on young children, selecting an architect, sample floor plans, and more.  For more information, visit www.spacesforchildren.com.

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Professional Associations and Collaboratives

California Child Development Administrators Association: A membership organization of publicly-funded child development program administrators that advocates on behalf of the children, families and programs that serve them. Activities include taking positions on and sponsoring state legislation and working to impact the state budget. For additional information visit http://www.ccdaa.org.

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC): Dedicated to improving the well-being of all young children, with particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age eight. For additional information visit http://www.naeyc.org or call (800) 424-2460.

National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC): A nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting quality child care by strengthening the profession of family child care. For additional information visit http://www.nafcc.org or call (801) 269-9338.

National AfterSchool Association: Dedicated to the development, education and care of children and youth during out-of-school hours. Project areas include a membership association, accreditation, public policy, and advocacy. For additional information visit http://www.naaweb.org or call (617) 298-5012.

Family Child Care Associations

California Association for Early Childhood Education
Lakewood, CA
(562) 728-5979
sandfcc@aol.com

Family Child Care Educators Association
P.O. Box 6288
Altadena, CA 91003
(626) 588-1290
(626) 398-4700
fcceassocoffice@onebox.com
http://www.FCCEA.com

Family Day Care Association of the Santa Clarita Valley
P.O. Box 802232
Santa Clarita, CA 91354-2232
(661) 250-4238
http://www.angelfire.co/ok3/familydaycareassoc/

Greater Long Beach/Lakewood Family Child Care Association, Inc.
Long Beach, CA
(562) 423-1086
http://www.childcarelb.com

Hispanic Child Care Provider Association
Los Angeles, CA 90019
(323) 935-4035
HCCPALA@aol.com

Los Angeles Family Child Care Association
Los Angeles, CA 90035
(323) 939-3764
AuntieRoxs@worldnet.att.net

Early Identification and Intervention Collaborative for Los Angeles County: A membership collaborative dedicated to improving and expanding timely identification of and intervention for children with or at risk of delays, disabilities and other barriers of development. The collaborative meets monthly at various locations across the county. For additional information contact Margaret Dunkle at MCD729@aol.com.

Infant Development Association of California (IDA): A multi-disciplinary organization of parents and professionals committed to optimal developmental, social and emotional outcomes for infants, birth to three, with a broad range of special needs, and their families. Advocates for improved, effective prevention and early intervention services and provides information, education and training to parents, professionals, decision makers and others. For additional information visit http://www.idaofcal.org or call (916) 453-8801.

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Connecting Families to Community Resources

211 LA County: Dedicated to providing guidance, advocacy, and 24 hour seven days per week access to a range of human services to the people of Los Angeles County. For more information or to access their services, visit http://www.infoline-la.org or call 211.

A Place of Our Own/Los Niños en Su Casa: KCET’s A Place of Our Own (and Los Niños en Su Casa in Spanish) is a daily television series, a Web site, and an extensive outreach program devoted to the unique needs of people who care for children, including families, friends, neighbors and child care providers. For additional information visit http://www.aplaceofourown.org. or http://www.losninosensucasa.org.

Adolescent Family Life Programs (AFLPs): Provide case management services to pregnant and parenting teens including: ensuring teens are able to meet their educational and career goals; promoting healthy family relationships; and assisting teens and their children with access to health and social services, including resources for finding and selecting a child care and development program. The AFLPs located in Los Angeles County are:

  • Youth Services Division/ALTAMED Health Services Corporation
    Monterey Park: (323) 278-4245
    Lynwood: (310) 605-0339
  • Teen Family Services/El Nido Family Centers
    Los Angeles: (213) 384-1600
    Inglewood: (310) 677-6014
  • Foothill Family Services
    Pasadena: (626) 564-1613
    West Covina: (626) 338-9200
    El Monte: (626) 442-8391
  • Project NATEEN/Childrens Hospital Los Angeles
    Los Angeles: (323) 669-5981

California School Age Families Education (Cal-SAFE): The Cal-SAFE Program is designed to support the academic success of pregnant and parenting teens and provide child care and development services to their children.

The following school districts offer Cal-SAFE Programs:

ABC Unified School District
(562) 926-7136
Baldwin Park Unified School District
(626) 962-3311
Bassett Unified School District
(626) 931-3005
Charter Oak Unified School District
(626) 966-8331 x215
Covina Valley Unified School District
(626) 974-7000 x2072
Glendale Unified School District
(818) 247-4805
Hacienda La Puente Unified School District
(626) 933-6540
Long Beach Unified School District
(562) 595-5366
Los Angeles County Office of Education
(562) 940-1873
Los Angeles Unified School District
(213) 482-1648
Montebello Unified School District
(323) 887-7929
Paramount Unified School District
(562) 602-6033
Rowland Unified School District
(626) 913-0376
Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District
(310) 399-5865
Walnut Valley Unified School District
(909) 468-5208
West Covina Unified School District
(626) 931-1810 x7
Whittier Union High School District
(562) 698-8121 x1201

Child Development Institute (CDI):  CDI provides families and other caregivers with guidance in building consistent and responsive relationships and creating natural and healthy environments for children with a range of developmental challenges.  CDI offers an array of programs and services to families and those that serve them, including mental health therapy, speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, social skills groups, Relationship-based Behavioral Therapy, Early Learners, Teacher Support Services, and Parent Support Services.   In addition, CDI has an Assessment Clinic to help parents by providing developmental assessments and diagnostic evaluations. Upon completion of an assessment, families receive treatment recommendations, education and support to navigate and make the most of the resources available in their community; and a Feeding Clinic, which offers a nurturing place for families to learn effective feeding strategies in a therapeutic environment. For more information, visit www.childdevelopmentinstitute.org or call (818) 888-4559

County of Los Angeles Public Library: The County libraries offer a variety of programs, services, and resources targeted to children and youth from birth on up and their families and the child care and development programs that serve them. Depending on the library, programs include Read & Play Together Storytime Kits, Family Place, Live Homework Help, and more. For information about library offerings and to locate your local county library, visit http://www.colapublib.org.

Early Head Start and Head Start Programs: Early Head Start Programs are free comprehensive programs for low-income pregnant women, infants, and toddlers from ages birth to three years old, including young children with disabilities. Services may be provided in the home of the family, a licensed family child care home, and/or a center. Comprehensive services include helping families get health, nutrition, and social services. Head Start Programs are free part-day (3½ hours) comprehensive child development programs for low-income and disabled preschoolers ages three to five years old living in the local community. Head Start generally operates from September through June. Families most in need, including families at risk and/or in crisis, four year old children, and children with disabilities, receive priority for enrollment. Comprehensive services include social services, health, mental health, nutrition, and parent involvement. To locate a local Head Start Program, visit http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/gslc/HeadStartOffices or contact your local child care resource and referral agency.

HealthyCity: Provides access to a data base of community resources, demographic/health data, and GIS mapping technology. Visit http://www.healthycity.org to find a variety of health and social services by zip code.

LACountyHelps.org: A web-based system to help families determine their eligibility to a variety of public health and human services-related programs, including: CalWORKS; Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI); Child Health and Disability Prevention Program (CHDP); Food Stamps; Medi-Cal, Healthy Families or Healthy Kids; Women, Infant and Children Services (WIC); and more. To learn more, visit http://www.LACountyHelps.org.

Los Angeles Centralized Eligibility List (LACEL):  Funded by the California Department of Education/Child Development Division (CDE/CDD) and administered by the Los Angeles County Office of Child Care, connects low-income families with subsidized child care and development services.  Families are added to the list through their local Child Care Resource and Referral Agency or their neighborhood child care and development program that is funded by CDE/CDD.  For more information, visit http://ceo.lacounty.gov/ccp/cel.htm.

Los Angeles Universal Preschool (LAUP): LAUP is an independent public benefit corporation created in 2004 and funded by First 5 LA – the commission established by Proposition 10. LAUP’s goal is to make voluntary, high-quality preschool available to every four year old child in Los Angeles County, regardless of their family’s income, by 2014. Additional information is available at http://www.laup.net or by calling toll-free (866) 675-5400.

SafetyBeltSafe U.S.A.: The national non-profit organization dedicated to child passenger safety. Several California laws contain provisions to protect children while riding in cars, including requiring children to ride in the back seat and properly buckled up in safety or booster seats depending on their age and size. Information on these laws, guidelines for child care providers, tools for parents and more is available at their Web site at http://www.carseat.org. The Web site also contains information on helmet laws for children under 18 who are skating or riding on a bicycle, scooter, or skateboard.

Southern California Edison (SCE) Energy Assistance Fund (EAF)/Rate Relief Assistance Program:  Pays up to $100 in one calendar year on a customer's SCE bill based on the actual amount owed.  For more information on the qualifications for this program and how to request assistance, click here.

State Preschool Programs: Free part-day (3½ hours) comprehensive child development program for three to four year old children from low-income families living in the local community. State Preschool Programs generally operate from August through June or September through June. Families with open cases with the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) receive priority for enrollment, as space is available. State Preschool provides free meals and snacks, offers parent education and encourages parent participation. Families are referred to health and social services, as needed. To locate a State Preschool Program, contact your local child care resource and referral agency.

Tools for Connecting Families with Community Resources:  The Child Care Planning Committee’s Inclusion Work Group has developed a packet of materials intended to facilitate a case management approach for connecting families to community resources in times of needs.  The packet includes case management flow charts, a form entitled “Identifying Need for Concrete Supports”, a “Referral Form”, and a quick list of referral agencies.  The Early Developmental Screening and Intervention Initiative has published the following materials to help families and those that serve them navigate the regional center system:  Tips for Providers Referring to Regional Centers, Parent Contact Form to Regional Center, Eligibility for the California Regional Center System, and Regional Center Referral and Intake Process Diagram.

Other Resources

Books and Music for Young Children:  For a list of recommended resources intended to help early educators select books and music that are developmentally appropriate to children of all ages, expose them to a variety of topics and genres, and are reflective of different cultures and abilities, click here

California Childcare Health Program:  Multidisciplinary team supports program staff in achieving healthy and safe practices in child care settings. In addition to preventing injuries and the spread of infectious diseases, committed to creating the best possible environments in which children can learn and grow.  For more information, visit www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org or call (800) 333-3212.

Healthy Child Care America: A project of the American Academy of Pediatrics provides information and links that address the health and safety of children in child care and development settings. For additional information visit http://www.healthychildcare.org.

reDiscover:  A non-profit, community resource that promotes creativity in early childhood and elementary education while encouraging environmental responsibility. Recycles everyday discards donated by businesses, such as plastic, fabric, wire, wood, metal, glass, and more and give them new purpose as hands-on learning materials.  For more information, visit www.rediscovercenter.org or call (310) 393-3636.

The Los Angeles-Orange Immunization Network (LINK):  The Los Angeles-Orange Immunization Network (LINK) is part of a state and national effort to improve the tracking and delivery of immunizations, for the better health of our children, families and communities. LINK is a confidential, computerized information system that consolidates and maintains electronic immunization records across multiple providers. It enables providers to track and update immunization records for patients, assess which vaccinations are due at each patient visit, and identify patients who should be sent reminder notices.  Schools and child care providers can have access to LINK, allowing them to check if children meet immunization eligibility requirements and allowing their students’ records to be entered into LINK. For additional information, please visit http://www.immunizelink.org.

Office of Child Care
Within the Service Integration Branch of the Chief Executive Office
County of Los Angeles
222 South Hill Street, 5th Floor
Los Angeles, California 90012
(213) 974-4103 Phone
(213) 217-5106 Facsimile
sib_occ@ceo.lacounty.gov